World Premiere of the Whisky Watch

Anthony S Casey attended the World Premiere of the Whisky Watch. Please scroll down to view images from that event.

Anthony S Casey

The Whisky Watch, created by Independent Swiss watch maker Louis Moinet and Wealth Solutions made its world debut at the Singapore Yacht Show yesterday evening, receiving special mention in today’s online edition of FORBES.

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A unique timepiece that contains drops of the world’s oldest whisky – Old Vatted Glenlivet 1862 – of a total 50 Whisky Watches, 23 have been sold or reserved as of this morning.
 Jean-Marie Schaller, CEO and Creative Director of the Louis Moinet Atelier, and Paweł Morozowicz, Wine & Spirit Portfolio Manager for Wealth Solutions thank you for your participation and look forward to facilitating your acquisition of this unique and highly collectible timepiece.


Jean-Marie Schaller, CEO and Creative Director of the Louis Moinet Atelier, and Paweł Morozowicz, Wine & Spirit Portfolio Manager for Wealth Solutions thank you for your participation and look forward to facilitating your acquisition of this unique and highly collectible timepiece.

Pioneering A New Investment

Anthony S Casey Singapore

Anthony S. Casey of Swiss Asia explains the firm’s offering of the Football Finance Note, and how it provides Asia’s wealthy with the opportunity to buy into English and European soccer. The next step is a similar product for other sports such as cricket, tennis, golf and more.

 

Anthony S Casey of Swiss Asia

 

 

Education and Inspiration from the Little Sisters Fund

2017 is here. Anthony S Casey is proud to support the Little Sisters Fund based out of Nepal. He are continually impressed by the achievements of our Little Sisters. They have already completed so much in the past few months! At the request of our partner schools, we are expanding our primary educator training program to Middle School this year! Plus, Little Sisters is touring soon to visit supporters.

The end of year fundraising campaign was a resounding success. Exceeded our goal by over 25 percent, over 2,000 girls are in school and Little Sisters is able to support them thanks to sponsors like Anthony S Casey.

Here are some highlights from recent successes.

 

Educator Training

Our Little Sisters receive the best education possible we strive to achieve this through the Primary Educator Training (PET) program. One school at a time, Little Sisters Fund continues to partner with schools to improve the Nepali education system for all students.

PET trains primary level teachers to use child-focused teaching methods that encourage analytical and critical thinking. In 2016, we conducted 22 trainings in 8 districts. 360 teachers attended these trainings, indirectly impacting approximately 9,000 students throughout Nepal. In 2017 as we work toward our goal of training teachers in all 90+ LSF primary partner schools. The PET course has been so successful at the primary level that, at the request of our partner schools, we’re putting together a pilot program to extend the course to secondary level teachers.

Meet Tribisha

In Nepal, any disability, and specifically one of this magnitude, can keep a girl out of school and cloistered or hidden away in the home. Tribisha was born with spina bifida and must use crutches and leg braces to walk. She has always been determined to defy the odds that have been stacked against her since birth.

Tribisha joined LSF in 2011. Now 16 years old, she inspires us with her determination and accomplishments. She was awarded the “Disabled Student Genius Award” for her high marks on the School Leaving Certificate exam in December and she will soon be publishing her first short novel, Niruta, which tells the story of the challenges a young girl faces growing up in Nepal.

Little Sisters is incredibly proud of Tribisha’s achievements and we look forward to watching her continue to inspire the girls who follow in her path. Read more of her story on LittleSistersFund.org.

 

A Happy New Year for The Little Sisters Fund

The Little Sisters Fund helps economically disadvantaged Nepalese girls to become empowered leaders.  Through education and community support, we aim to contribute to the development of a more equitable and prosperous world. All children deserve the right to education, regardless of the basis of gender. With the Little Sisters Fund, 98% of Little Sisters continue in the program and with their studies every year. To compare, only 56% of poor rural girls complete primary school, and just over 20% complete grades 9 and 10.

The Little Sisters Fund is filled with gratitude for the opportunity of the future, of 2017. Continuing to support over two thousand Little Sisters, they are extraordinarily grateful for the chance to continue letting their lives flourish.  They show dedication and compassion every day.

The gratitude they show on a daily basis inspires us to work even harder. Each Little Sister’s education is fully funded through twelfth grade and that they will soar into college and their adult life after they graduate from our program.

Happy 2017 from the Little Sisters Fund. Hopefully it is filled with the same compassion, dedication, and gratitude lived out by the Little Sisters every day.

The Impact of Social Investment

anthony s casey singapore philanthropySocial investment is about investing in people. Social investing involves policies in communities, designed to strengthen skills and support them to participate in employment and social life. Policy areas vary from education, health care, quality childcare, training, disaster rehabilitation and job-search assistance

The question for social investors of starts with how can you make the world a better place?

Understand the needs of others.  Open yourself up to critique and listen to advice from those affected by the issue.  Understanding is a process that requires us to orient our ideas toward appropriate intervention.

Social investing can come in many forms. While altruism and guilt seem to be the prime motivator for investing in social issues, making an impact has started to surface as a third form of motivation with expectations of market-rate returns for social investments.

 

Social investors are driven by the aspiration to build something positive rather than the desire to fix existing liabilities and weaknesses.

Social investment is repayable finance that creates both social and financial returns. It is provided to charities, social enterprises and socially motivated businesses. Investors expect to get their money back (often with interest) and expect the finance to have created identifiable social impact. Social investment is not a grant or a donation. This group of aspirational investors typically use a value-based investment to build and manage their portfolio. Portfolio managers conduct all of their activities from selection and due diligence to impact assessment.

Faith, Gender and the Environment

In the faith-based investment category, a strong focus on human dignity and stewardship of the environment from the lens of charity. The focus is on projects that help the poor or less fortunate. These investments exclude industries such as tobacco, alcohol, and gambling. Gender investment benefits women who are otherwise overshadowed. Investing provides more equal opportunities, better access to the labour market and thus better social protection.

Social Investing solutions aim to provide great value to the world, beyond fiscal greed. The greatest value is achieved when social goals are at the forefront of the business strategy. There is a clear desire of investors to earn a stable return, all while achieving social impact.

 

Read more:

www.asiaiix.com

 

Access – The Foundation for Social Investment

How Future Generations Will Define Philanthropy

Millennials is not always a nice term. People typically think of this generation as a self-centered, lazy, materialistic bunch.

But, millennials are actually a lot more generous than you think.

According to an article in CNBC, millennials are on track to be the next major donors. On average, millennials donate an annual gift of $481 US dollars.

An article from the Case foundation cites that millennials practice philanthropy in the same ways as older generations. But, their underlying motivations are different. Passion, meeting people and enhancing expertise in certain fields now influence this young influential generation to contribute to their society.

The generation of coffee-drinking, small-batch draft beer preferring college-educated courageous young people, or sometimes known as millennials, who are heralding in a new age of giving. Because of this, we need to think of an “appendage” to the existing definition of philanthropy, which reflects new criteria and includes the time spent with the cause, talent one can use to benefit the cause, financial contributions donated for charitable work (even $5 per month), the influence of an individual’s voice advocating and educating others, and the potential to grow one’s network through leveraging personal and professional relationship.

Millennials are happy to participate. It’s good for nonprofits and charities to institute a set of guidelines for volunteers and donors. This way institutions can expect them to work or give within those specific parameters without risking losing your framework. Why turn away something positive and impactful just because it’s not the way you’ve always done things? Remember, millennials don’t “give” to organizations. They support causes. Because this demographic typically spends so much of their social lives on the internet, on platforms like Facebook and Instagram, they have the power to connect with hundreds of people to a cause they’re passionate about.

Nonprofits are now forced to clean up their act and be a little more transparent. This is because millennials demand engagement. These people want to be informed of where their money is going and how they are making an impact. They’d rather stay connected than donate once and forget about it. Stay in touch with these young philanthropists and philanthropy will change forever.

Follow Anthony S Casey Singapore on Twitter for more.

Football Philanthropists: Cristiano Ronaldo

The football world has many excellent philanthropists, as I detailed in a previous post. Let’s take a look at another great example; a footballer so successful, their star so bright, that their massive contributions are easy to overlook. I’m talking about none other than Cristiano Ronaldo.

Cristiano, despite his sometimes tiring dramatics on the pitch, is an accomplished philanthropist. The son of a gardener, Ronaldo has excelled at football’s highest stages for his current club, Real Madrid. And he has been rewarded handsomely. He takes down around £230,000 a week in salary alone. Add that to his numerous endorsement deals and we are talking about an extremely wealthy individual. To be fair, he has absolutely earned it. Ronaldo’s accomplishments are numerous, both with his teams and as an individual. He was with Manchester United from 2003 to 2009, contributing to 3 league titles, including a double winner when they took the Champions League in 2008. That same season, he was awarded the Ballon d’Or and a laundry list of other accolades. For Real Madrid, he has won La Liga, taken the Copa twice, and most recently personally sealed the Champions League victory in penalties (after a fairly tame 120 minutes of play). Add to that Portugal’s victory in the Europeans Championship this summer and Cristiano has really done it all. But what has he done for the world at large? As it turns out: a lot.

Ronaldo’s philanthropy started early. In 2004, when the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami devastated Indonesia, television cameras captured a child wearing the Portuguese number 7 shirt. The boy has survived for 19 days alone after his family was swept away. After seeing the footage, Cristiano traveled to Aceh, Indonesia to raise money for the rebuilding process.

After his mother battled and beat cancer at a hospital in Madeira, Portugal, Cristiano donated £100,000 to the institution to build a cancer centre. He returned to Madeira in 2010 after floods devasted the area to raise money in a charity football match.

After winning the Golden Boot in 2011, he sold the thing and donated the 1.5 million pound purse to pay for schools in Gaza. In 2013, Cristiano was named Save the Children’s newest Global Artist Ambassador. Recently, he launched an app called CR7Selfie which raises money for Save the Children.

He also joined Drogba and others in FIFA’s “11 against Ebola campaign”.

His latest gesture came after his club’s win in the Champions League in Milan. Cristiano netted the winning penalty, and then (after some celebrations, surely), donated his £600,000 bonus to charity, in its entirety.

Those are just a handful of the ways that Cristiano Ronaldo has given back. It’s no wonder that DoSomething.org named him atop their list of most charitable athletes in 2015.

 

To see more from Anthony S Casey, check out his Twitter.

Children’s Wishing Well

Check out the brand new website from Singapore’s Wishing Well foundation.

Children’s Wishing Well was founded in 2002. Founder Georgie Chung built a team that offered advice to students who lacked family support necessary to succeed.

How to they help today? For example, they provide groceries every month and pocket money for lunch. Grant-A-Wish is their signature program. It helps disadvantaged students with school supplies, healthcare, and basic living needs.

Wishing Well has provided a range of need, such as  eyeglasses, fumigation services, or tennis sneakers. Anything to give a child support and the chance to succeed.

The goal of “When I Grow Up” through the “Career GPS” program, launched this year in 2016, is to show students the roles in societies. These range from teacher, chef, entrepreneur, or computer programmer, to name a few..
The past few months have been hectic for director Georgie Chung. He has been working hard to launch the Career GPS programs.

What exactly is CGPS? CGPS collects students and brings them to different companies to give them a vision of potential careers. “What do you want to be when you grow up?” is a daunting question, and Wishing Well hopes to make the future a real possibility for these youngsters.

Career GPS exposes students to a variety of industries.Students have seen how a bank operates and how 3D printing machines work. They spoke with a CEO, who before his current role, had to deliver newspapers to when he was young for money. Each visit is interactive, informative and inspiring!

Phase 2 is still undergoing development. The organization will place students with undergrads or corporate partners. wherein they set individual goals and work through programs that incorporate teamwork.

 

See their website: http://www.wishingwell.org.sg/

The Major Leagues of Giving Back

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We love stories of celebrities giving back to the communities that raised them or to the world at large. Bill Gates is an obvious example. The legacy created by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation may very well dwarf the legacy of Microsoft. People who made their fortunes in the public have a bit more scrutiny on them to give back. Especially for athletes or movie stars, we look for them to be philanthropic, in part because their fortunes exist thanks to the tickets purchased by fans, either to the cinema or the stadium. Sometimes we are left wanting, but there are plenty of stories of your favorite stars giving back in very significant ways. Let’s take a look at an example of such; when a star has done so much for their community that the rest of the world takes note. I am talking about none other than football star Didier Drogba.

Drogba is a veteran footballer, currently playing for the Montreal Impact in Major League Soccer in North America. However, he is best known as a striker for Chelsea. He played in London for the Blues for 8 years from 2004-2012 (he also signed for a season in 2014). His professional successes include winning the league numerous times, claiming all the cups you could carry, and even a game winner in the Champions League final (sure it was in the penalty shootout, but his equalizer in the dying minutes of the match got them there). And when he was not scoring against Arsenal, Drogba was playing for his homeland — the Ivory Coast.

His connection to the Ivory Coast is where his philanthropy grew from. The Didier Drogba Foundation has donated millions of dollars to projects benefitting children all across Africa. Most famously;

Drogba donated his entire £3 million signing fee from a Pepsi sponsorship to build a hospital his hometown of Abidjan.

Most significant, though, is Drogba’s direct contribution to returning peace to the Ivory Coast. In the mid-2000s, the country was embroiled in a bloody civil war, with violence threatening all Ivorians constantly. At the height of the violence, the White Elephants were trying to qualify for the 2006 World Cup. After a decisive victory, cameras flooded into the locker room to capture the rapturous celebrations from the squad. Presented with this opportunity, Drogba grabbed a microphone, dropped to his knees, and begged for peace. He pleaded for the rebel forces and the government alike to lay down their arms. No more than a week later, a ceasefire was declared.

 

Soon after, Drogba was again able to bring his country closer together. The Ivorian team was set to play Madagascar in an African Nations Cup qualifier. He used his considerable leverage to arrange for the match to be played in Bouake, a northern city in the heart of the rebel’s stronghold. It was the first time a match had been played in the north of the Ivory Coast since the civil war began. Drogba watched on as leaders from both the warring factions stood side by side for the national anthem. In an interview with the Telegraph, Didier said, “I felt then that that the Ivory Coast was born again.”

 

The White Elephants won that match 5-0. Following the landslide victory, government and rebel forces joined in the streets to celebrate. Afterward, the leader of the rebel forces was quoted, “The 5-nil scoreline represents five goals to erase five years of suffering. It would have taken months and even years for my ministry to achieve what Didier Drogba and his teammates have achieved in 90 minutes”

 

It was for these contributions that Time Magazine named Didier Drogba on their list of the 100 Most Influential People in 2010. Many athletes attach their names to civil centers, or donate to charities, but in terms of real-world benefits, few can match the Ivory Coast’s favorite son, Didier Drogba. Similar to Bill Gates, his greatest legacy may not be his professional accomplishments, but rather what those accomplishments allowed him to do.

Generosity while Traveling

When Anthony S Casey was traveling in Bangkok for work, he took some time to give back. Anthony S Casey along with Steve Knabl, COO of Swiss-Asia, took some time out of their busy schedule to make a special trip.

One day, Steve and Anthony jumped into a Uber car. They headed to a big supermarket. Here, they bought a full shopping cart of candy, toys, facepaint, and various games.

Why did they do so?

They were on their way to Baan Nokkamin Orphanage, on the outskirts of the city. When they arrived, they met with the resident director. Here, Anthony and Steve handed out the toys the the children. From teddy bears to footballs, to funny glasses and games, the kids had a blast getting new gifts.

anthony s casey resident director bangkok orphanage

Baan Nokkamin’s Resident Director

 

They painted the faces of any willing volunteers once the group of kids settled down after the excitement of their new gifts. Both Steve and I donated to the foundation, but the best gift of all was seeing the smiling faces of all the kids now covered in face paint and glitter.

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Anthony and Steve were still covered in glitter when they rushed to the airport, which gave the  airport security quite a laugh!

Plesae read this original post on Anthony S Casey’s Linkedin. Follow him on Twitter as well.

Anthony can’t wait to make it back to Bangkok and visit the children of the Baan Nokkamin Orphanage.