10 Charitable Campaigns in Singapore

There are incredible charitable campaigns that exist in Singapore. Read on to learn the names of those important charitable campaigns:

50 for 50: In this campaign, fifty young people organized fundraisers for lesser-known charities. In addition to fostering youth involvement in philanthropy, it raised 2.25 million dollars. The government then matched this money, resulting in a total of $4.5 million dollars raised.

1 for 1: Spurred by the success of 50 for 50, the campaign organizers began 1 for 1, in which all Singaporeans were encouraged to donate a dollar, which would again be matched by the government.

Fold a Crane for Charity: In this campaign against hunger, Songhe Fragrant Rice challenged Singaporeans to fold paper cranes. For every paper crane folded, the company donated a bowl of rice to charity. The campaign exceeded all expectations, resulting in 147,480 kilograms of rice getting donated in total.

Grains of Kindness: This is another campaign against hunger launched by Songhe Fragrant Rice. This time, however, instead of making paper cranes, people were encouraged to post photographs of random acts of kindness to Facebook. Each photo earned a 10kg donation of rice.

Hair for Hope: In this campaign, launched by the Children’s Cancer Foundation, participants shaved their heads in solidarity with cancer parents who lost their hair to chemotherapy. Shavees solicited donations or sponsorships for the cause, while proving that baldness was nothing to be ashamed of.

Giving Tuesday: In 2013, the National Volunteer & Philanthropy Center designated the last Tuesday in November to be Giving Tuesday. On this day, Singaporeans are encouraged to donate to a number of charitable organizations. The day also includes social media campaigns, volunteer opportunities, corporate donors and sponsorships.

Giving Week: Due to its success, Giving Tuesday was expanded into Giving Week, beginning the last Tuesday in November and stretching into the first week of December. Giving Week came with more campaigns, more charities, and more corporate sponsorships.

For a Golden Home: Singapore has an aging population. Many elderly Singaporeans live alone in small apartments, often in poor conditions. For a Golden Home raises money to improve these apartments, and enlists the help of volunteers to go in and clean everything up.

President’s Challenge: Begun by President S.R. Nathan in 2000, the President’s Challenge is a platform for individuals and corporations to engage with a number of charitable organizations. Beneficiaries of the President’s Challenge, as well as the amount that they receive, are decided by the Office of the President.

Heartstrings Walk: Community Chest, the charitable arm of the National Council of Social Services, is a charitable organization that helps disabled people integrate into society, learn skills, and realize their potential. Their annual Heartstrings Walk takes participants on a walk around the city, in return for donations and sponsorships.

 

How Future Generations Will Define Philanthropy

Millennials is not always a nice term. People typically think of this generation as a self-centered, lazy, materialistic bunch.

But, millennials are actually a lot more generous than you think.

According to an article in CNBC, millennials are on track to be the next major donors. On average, millennials donate an annual gift of $481 US dollars.

An article from the Case foundation cites that millennials practice philanthropy in the same ways as older generations. But, their underlying motivations are different. Passion, meeting people and enhancing expertise in certain fields now influence this young influential generation to contribute to their society.

The generation of coffee-drinking, small-batch draft beer preferring college-educated courageous young people, or sometimes known as millennials, who are heralding in a new age of giving. Because of this, we need to think of an “appendage” to the existing definition of philanthropy, which reflects new criteria and includes the time spent with the cause, talent one can use to benefit the cause, financial contributions donated for charitable work (even $5 per month), the influence of an individual’s voice advocating and educating others, and the potential to grow one’s network through leveraging personal and professional relationship.

Millennials are happy to participate. It’s good for nonprofits and charities to institute a set of guidelines for volunteers and donors. This way institutions can expect them to work or give within those specific parameters without risking losing your framework. Why turn away something positive and impactful just because it’s not the way you’ve always done things? Remember, millennials don’t “give” to organizations. They support causes. Because this demographic typically spends so much of their social lives on the internet, on platforms like Facebook and Instagram, they have the power to connect with hundreds of people to a cause they’re passionate about.

Nonprofits are now forced to clean up their act and be a little more transparent. This is because millennials demand engagement. These people want to be informed of where their money is going and how they are making an impact. They’d rather stay connected than donate once and forget about it. Stay in touch with these young philanthropists and philanthropy will change forever.

Follow Anthony S Casey Singapore on Twitter for more.

Generosity while Traveling

When Anthony S Casey was traveling in Bangkok for work, he took some time to give back. Anthony S Casey along with Steve Knabl, COO of Swiss-Asia, took some time out of their busy schedule to make a special trip.

One day, Steve and Anthony jumped into a Uber car. They headed to a big supermarket. Here, they bought a full shopping cart of candy, toys, facepaint, and various games.

Why did they do so?

They were on their way to Baan Nokkamin Orphanage, on the outskirts of the city. When they arrived, they met with the resident director. Here, Anthony and Steve handed out the toys the the children. From teddy bears to footballs, to funny glasses and games, the kids had a blast getting new gifts.

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Baan Nokkamin’s Resident Director

 

They painted the faces of any willing volunteers once the group of kids settled down after the excitement of their new gifts. Both Steve and I donated to the foundation, but the best gift of all was seeing the smiling faces of all the kids now covered in face paint and glitter.

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Anthony and Steve were still covered in glitter when they rushed to the airport, which gave the  airport security quite a laugh!

Plesae read this original post on Anthony S Casey’s Linkedin. Follow him on Twitter as well.

Anthony can’t wait to make it back to Bangkok and visit the children of the Baan Nokkamin Orphanage.

The Happy Faces of Baan Nokkamin

Anthony S Casey recently traveled from Singapore to Bangkok for a visit. If you’ve never been, you’ll see a lot of things when you visit the city. You will see the Wat Phra Kaeo glistening in the Grand Palace, you’ll see luxurious goods in department stores in Siam, or maybe you’ll see world-renowned art museums. What you won’t see are the faces of those that have been left behind by the city’s success; underprivileged children; many who are without a home.

One foundation, Baan Nokkamin, developed with the goal to make home a reality for the orphans, homeless children, and children of drug addicts that live in Bangkok.

These children are a consequence of collapse in the family structure and home disputes which parents are incapable of solving. The effects of this collapse trickle down to cause rise to the unfortunate problem of orphans, drug addicts, and subsequent sexual abuse and child labor and criminal activity and social decay. So, Baan Nokkamin is there to relieve these children from this lifestyle and benefit them with positive values? Baan Nokkamin is there to educate children about how to help children achieve a wholesome vision and thus benefit others around them.

How did the orphanage get its start? A Swiss missionary, Mr. Erwin Groebli, met a group of street children in Ramkhamhaeng, Bangkok Metropolis in the late 1980’s. They had nowhere to sleep, no nourishment, and no one offer health support.

Mr.Erwin gave to these kids love and attention and the support they needed to survive. The beginning of the foundation started when a functional building was acquired to accommodate the group. By 1989, Baan Nokkamin Foundation was certified by the Thai government.

Anthony S Casey visited the Baan Nokkamin orphanage. He brought along a big bag of toys, candy and face painting for all the kids. It was lots of fun! Here are some pictures of their day together.  Anthony S Casey invites you to contribute to the organization, which you can find online.

Focus on the Family: Singapore

Focus on the Family Singapore Limited is a donor-supported organization dedicated to the mission that the family unit is the essential building block of a thriving nation. Mr. Tan Thuan Seng established the organization in 2002. The foundational small team started by organizing events dedicated to fostering the irreplaceable bonds of family through counseling parents and couples about the importance of these bonds.

Focus on the Family provides support in the form of educational support. Their Parent-Coach dialogue allows parents to engage with others undergoing the same experience and learn from others’ perspectives. Workshops to help couples with marriage help keep personal lives in shape for both parents and for the children. For example, Connect2 is a marriage preparation program that helps couples address issues they may not expect early in their time together and build a strong foundation right at the start.

 

Date with Dad

By encouraging the transformation of society through healthy and positive family values today, Focus on the Family foresees the sustainability of future generations.

 

 

Dance Spectrum International: Singapore

 

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How can we afford young people with developmental disabilities the same opportunities and experiences as their peers? The Autism Research Centre of Singapore helps educate people about autism and dedicates to serve individuals in the country with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The charity was established in 2000 and has since become the leader not only in fundraising, but implementing real change for individuals who need assistance asserting independence in their lives. The Pathlight School is one of their primary resources that offers both mainstream academics and essential life skills for students with autism.  Additionally, they host many events and fundraising opportunities to contribute to their efforts.

The Dance Spectrum International is one of these events that is essential to the Autism Research Center. It offers a life-changing experience for many of these young people.

Dance Spectrum International has become an annual tradition. In past years, dancers have performed acts titled such as “Christmas isn’t Christmas until..” This performance raised $132,602 toward supporting the Pathlight School Building Fund.

The most recent performance was help on December 4th, hosted at the Republic Cultural Centre. At this beautiful cultural landmark,  Ms Denise Phua Lay Peng in the Jalan Besar Group Representation Constituency and Guest Member and Ms Irene Ng attended the “Concert of Hope” in support of children and adolescents on the autism spectrum.

 

For more on the Autism research center, and to see how you can contribute, please see Autism.org.sg.